Nitan Avivi-Stuhl

He/Him/His

Mathematics

Computer Science

Matroid Theory

Coming soon!

Mentor

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Desirae Brown

She/Her/Hers

Sociology

French

The Effects of University Student Demands and Protests on Administrative Responses, Diversity Numbers, and Retention Rates

In the 2015-16 academic year, colleges and universities across the United States saw an uprising of student protests followed by student demands. These demands were made primarily by African American and other student of color unions. Students rallied to challenge the history and culture of racism on their campuses, primarily on Predominately White Institutions. They did so by demanding their universities to actively commit to updating, changing and enacting a multitude of diversity initiatives that include but are not limited to, the hiring of more Black faculty, the opening of Black cultural centers, and increasing Black student enrollment and retention. This paper will study the present culture of the universities that received demands in 2015. I will look to find, what has changed in five years? Has there been increases in enrollment, are there cultural centers and has the campus culture improved since those protest and demands? The research will begin by studying the history of student protests and demands, it will continue with research on the content of the demands of 2015. Finally, I will look at the numerical data reported by universities who received demands in 2015, and compare them to the most recent data available.

Mentor

Dr. Debra Thompson, Political Science

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Ally Carlile

She/Her/Hers

Biology

Mathematics & Chemistry

Behavioral Correlates in Sleeping Laboratory Mice

Pupillometry has effectively correlated pupil size with cortical states in awake mice. High amounts of brain activity have been associated with large pupil size whereas low amounts of brain activity associate with smaller pupil size in awake mice. The purpose of this project is to acquire widefield imaging on sleeping laboratory mice in order to gain a better understanding of mouse neuronal activity during sleep. I aim to find lower amounts of brain activity and small pupil size during non-REM sleep along with high amounts of brain activity with large pupil size during REM sleep.The widefield and pupil imaging will provide the opportunity to correlate certain neuronal activity with behaviors and other neuronal activity with deeper neural mechanisms happening during sleep. Some of the behavior correlates we will use are: movement of whiskers, paws, and fluctuation of the pupil size. Once the behavioral activity is excluded, the deeper neural mechanisms during sleep will be narrowed down and able to be focused on. Finding the deeper neural mechanisms will enable track neural circuits and networks involved during different stages of sleep in order to evolve a better profile of overall neuronal activity during sleep.

Mentor

Dr. David McCormick, Institute of Neuroscience

Matthew Dawson

They/Them/Theirs

Biology & Psychology

Cell Specific Ablation in Zebrafish: an Examination of Social Behavior

Coming soon!

Screening Practices for Brain Injury in Homeless Youth Programs

Coming soon!

Mentor

Dr. Philip Washbourne, Institute of Neuroscience

Dr. Christina Karns, Psychology

Dr. Laurie Ehlhardt Powell, Center on Brain Injury Research and Training

Dr. Melissa McCart, Center on Brain Injury Research and Training

Ashley Easter

She/Her/Hers

Family and Human Services

Sociology

Exploring Factors Associated with Obesity in Rural Oregon

Abstract coming soon!

Mentor

Dr. Elizabeth Budd, Family and Human Services & Prevention Science

Lisa Guerricabeitia

She/Her/Hers

Psychology & Theatre Arts

Parsing Influences of Dysregulation on Eating Habits in Rural School-Aged Children

Abstract coming soon!

Mentor

Dr. Nichole Kelly, Counseling Psychology


Neila (Nina) Kerkebane

She/Her/Hers

Economics

Mathematics

Impact of Tuition Increases on the Enrollment Rates of Low-Income Students

Abstract coming soon!

Mentor

Dr. Jonathan Davis, Economics

Ash Martins

She/Her/Hers, They/Them/Theirs

Sociology

Psychology

Coming soon!

Coming soon!

Mentor

Photo coming soon!

Tristan McKibben

She/Her/Hers

Biochemistry

Ethics

Coming soon!

Abstract coming soon!

Mentor

Mentor coming soon!

Joe Moore

He/Him/His

Sociology

Gentrification and Eviction Crisis: Tacoma

Abstract coming soon!

Mentor

Dr. Clare Evans, Sociology

Antonio Munoz

He/Him/His

Biology

Psychology

Odor Concentration Change Sensing in Mice

Our brains are constantly tracking dynamic sensory information from our environment. Exactly how the brain computes sensory input over time is not fully understood. The mouse olfactory system provides a great model to study stimuli changes over time because mice utilize odor concentration changes for olfactory navigation. It is not understood how mice optimize sensory information for spatial navigation. One of the mechanisms guiding odor localization involves changes in odor concentration (ΔC). The ability to track odor concentration gradients is critical for vertebrates like the mouse for survival. Previous work has observed a population of neurons in the olfactory bulb that are sensitive to concentration changes in odor. We hypothesize that this neuronal population is essential for perception of concentration changes. To test olfactory perception in mice, we are characterizing how sensitive mice are to detecting concentration changes. My experiment uses trained head-fixed mice contained in an odor delivery apparatus. This unique setup enables extremely fast control of odor concentration, and allows me to alter the concentration of odor between inhalations. Mice receive a water award when correctly detecting a concentration change. In our set-up, mice easily learn to perform olfactory discriminations. By investigating ΔC tracking behaviors in mice, my goal is to relate the neural activity we see in a defined neuronal population with a behavioral representation in mice and increase our understanding of sensory optimization.

Mentor

Avinash Singh, Biology

Allysia Rainey

She/Her/Hers

Psychology

The Association Between Socioeconomic Status and Depression in Adolescent Females

Previous literature has shown that parental socioeconomic status during adolescence is associated with internalizing symptoms and behavioral problems. In addition, research has found that females are at the highest risk for maintaining severe symptoms. The purpose of this study is to replicate these findings and propose ways in which these issues may be addressed. In this study, we will look at the correlation of socioeconomic status and depression in adolescent females. The data will be pooled from variables measured in the Transitions in Adolescent Girls (TAG) study. Mental health was measured using the CES-DC. Socioeconomic
status was measured by a demographic questionnaire and the MacArthur Scale of Subjective Social Status. A hierarchical regression analysis was used to analyze the data while controlling for age.

Mentor

Dr. Jennifer Pfeifer, Psychology

Meghan Ramirez

She/Her/Hers

Psychology

Sociology & Anthropology

The Effects of Natural Sounds on the Autonomic Nervous System

Exposure to naturally occurring sounds such as rain or wind through trees is known to evoke feelings of relaxation, but the neurophysiological mechanisms involved in this process have not been heavily researched. An overarching aim of this proposal is to understand the promise and potential limitations of simultaneous neural and cardiovascular physiological recordings to elucidate the mechanisms of environmental influences of stress and emotions. Specifically, we aim to determine the extent to which natural sounds modulate the autonomic stress response and ongoing neural oscillations. Through a systematic literature review of the relationship between autonomic nervous system engagement, neural measures of brain activity, and state and trait measures of mood and stress we will design an experiment to test the effects of stimuli in the natural environment on stress mechanisms. We expect that measures of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity (heart-rate variability and pre-ejection period respectively), and ongoing neural oscillations will emerge important potential measurements of stress, which could be modulated by the environment. Broadly, we expect that exposure to naturally evoked sounds will reduce stress response during physical and psychological stress with applications to future research in healthcare, psychiatry, and educational settings.

Mentor

Dr. Christina Karns, Psychology

Dr. Melissa McCart, Center on Brain Injury Research and Training