Jennifer Ablow

Psychology

Jennifer Ablow, Associate Professor of Psychology, received her PhD from UC Berkeley in 1997 and joined the University of Oregon faculty in 1999. Dr. Ablow is interested in understanding the origins of adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation. She examines how factors, such as poverty, maternal stress, mental health, and early parent-infant interactions intersect with the young child’s own susceptibilities to contribute to children’s early emotion regulatory capacities. She is co-director with Dr. Jeffrey Measelle of the Developmental Sociobiology Lab. Her publications include “A Cry in the Dark: Depressed Mothers Show Reduced Neural Activation to Their Own Infant’s Cry” (with H.K. Laurent), SCAN (2012); Poverty, Problem Behavior and Promise: Differential Susceptibility among Infants Reared in Poverty” (with E. Conradt and J. Measelle), Psychological Science (2013); “Associations between First-time Expectant Women’s Representations of Attachment and Their Physiological Reactivity to Cry” (with A.K. Marks, et al.), Child Development (2013), and “Shaping emotion regulation: Attunement, symptomatology, and stress recovery within mother-infant dyads” (with B.D. Ostlund, J.R. Measelle, H. K. Laurent, and E. Conradt), Developmental Psychobiology (in press).

Student Scholar

Tonya C. Hansberry, Psychology

Bruce Bowerman

Biology

Institute of Molecular Biology

Dr. Bruce Bowerman received his PhD from UC San Francisco in 1989. After his postdoctoral work at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, he joined the UO faculty in 1992. Currently a Professor of Biology, department chair, and member of the Institute of Molecular Biology, Dr. Bowerman uses molecular genetics and live cell imaging to study cytoskeletal regulation and function in the early C.elegans embryo. Current projects in the Bowerman lab focus on oocyte meiotic spindle assembly, which occurs in the absence of the microtubule organizing centers called centrosomes, and mitotic spindle assembly, which is organized in large part by centrosomes. Publications include “Oocyte Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Function” (with A.F. Severson and G. von Dassow), Current Topics in Developmental Biology (2016); “E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Promote Progression of Differentiation during C. elegans Embryogenesis” (with Z.Du, F. He, Z. Yu, and Z. Bao), Developmental Biology (2015); “Cell Biology: Scaling and the Emergence of Evolutionary Cell Biology (with P.C. Phillips), Current Biology (2015); and “High-Throughput Cloning of Temperature-Sensitive Caenorhabditis elegans Mutants with Adult Syncytial Germline Membrane Architecture Defects” (with J. Lowry et al.), G3 (2015).

Student Scholar

Thalia Padilla, Biology

Rachel Cunningham

Biochemistry

Rachael Cunningham is a PhD candidate in biochemistry. She completed her BS in forensic chemistry at Lake Superior State University in 2010 and joined the DeRose lab in 2012. Her current research focuses on the interactions of the anticancer drug Cisplatin with cell proteins and understanding how those interactions contribute to the drug’s mechanism of action. Publications include: “Convenient Detection of Metal-DNA, Metal-RNA, and Metal-Protein Adducts with a Click-Modified Pt(II) Complex” (with A.D. Moghaddam, J.D. White, A.N.Loes, M.M. Haley, and V.J. DeRose), Dalton Transactions (2015).

Student Scholar

Trenton M. Peters-Clarke, Biochemistry, Biology

Victoria DeRose

Chemistry

Institute of Molecular Biology

Dr. Victoria DeRose received her PhD from UC Berkeley in 1990. After post-doctoral work at Northwestern and service as a faculty member at Texas A&M, she joined the faculty of the UO Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 2006. Since coming to the UO, Prof. DeRose has received a Fund for Faculty Members Excellence Award and has been elected an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow. Work in the DeRose lab uses biological and bioinorganic chemistry and spectroscopic methods to explore the chemical activity and structure in nucleic acids and proteins, with an emphasis on metal interactions. Recent publications include “Multifunctional Pt(II) Reagents: Covalent Modifications of Pt Complexes Enable Diverse Structural Variation and In-Cell Detection” (with J.D. White and M.M. Haley), Acc. Chem. Res. (2016); “Azide vs Alkyne Functionalization in Pt(II) Complexes for Post-treatment Click Modification: Solid-State Structure, Fluorescent Labeling, and Cellular Fate” (with R.Wirth et al.), J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2015); “An Alkyne-Appended, Click-Ready Pt(II) Complex with an Unusual Arrangement in the Solid State” (with J.D. White et al.), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (2015); and “Convenient Detection of Metal-DNA, Metal-RNA, and Metal-Protein Adducts With a Click-Modified Pt(II) Complex” (with A.D. Moghaddam et al.), Dalton Transactions (2015).

Student Scholar

Trenton M. Peters-Clarke, Biochemistry, Biology

Aaron Gullickson

Sociology

Dr. Aaron Gullickson earned his PhD in sociology and demography from UC Berkeley in 2004. After teaching for three years at Columbia University, he joined the UO faculty in 2007. Currently, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Sociology, Dr. Gullickson focuses his research on the nexus of inequality, race, ethnicity, and kinship. One new project examines the development of the one-drop rule and the stratification of mixed-race individuals in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Recent publications include “Patterns of racial and educational assortative mating in Brazil” (with F. Torche), Demography (forthcoming); “Essential Measures: Ancestry, Race, and Social Difference” American Behavioral Scientist (2016); “A Mulatto Escape Hatch? Examining Evidence of U.S. Racial and Social Mobility During the Jim Crow Era” (with A. Saperstein), Demography (2013); and “Choosing Race: Multiracial Ancestry and Identification” (with A. Morning), Social Science Research (2011).

Student Scholar

Benjamin HindeSociology

Sara Hodges

Psychology

Associate Dean of the Graduate School

Dr. Sara Hodges received her PhD from the University of Virginia in 1995 and joined the University of Oregon faculty the same year. Currently Professor of Psychology and Associate Dean of the UO Graduate School, Dr. Hodges runs the Social Cognition Lab, which studies how people form an understanding of other people. Some current projects in her lab examine how empathic accuracy (the ability to accurately infer other people’s thoughts) is affected by context, personal experience, gender, and the use of stereotypes; and how perceptions of the self influence perceptions of other people. Her publications include “It’s All About the Self: When Perspective Taking Backfires” (with C. Sassenrath and S. Pfattheicher), Current Directions in Psychological Science (in press); “The Matter of Other Minds: Empathic Accuracy and the Factors that Influence It” (with K.L. Lewis and W. Ickes), in APA Handbook of Personality and Social Psychology: Vol 2, Interpersonal Relations and Group Processes (P. Shaver, M. Mikulincer, eds.), American Psychological Association (2015); “From East to West: Accessibility and Bias in Self-Other Comparative Judgments” (with C. Christian and I. Lee), Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, (2014); and “When Trying Hard Isn’t Natural: Women’s Belonging with and Motivation for Male-Dominated STEM Fields as a Function of Effort Expenditure Concerns” (with J.L. Smith, K.L. Lewis, and L. Hawthorne), Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (2013).

 

 

Student Scholar

Kristina Lowney, Psychology

Ocean Howell

History of Art and Architecture, Honors College

Dr. Ocean Howell earned his PhD in architectural and urban history from UC Berkeley in 2009 and joined the UO faculty the next year. With joint appointment to the Clark Honors College and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Dr. Howell’s research focuses on how the built environment both reflected and shaped social experience in the twentieth-century United States with a particular interest in questions of urban planning and ethnicity. His publications include Making the Mission: Planning and Ethnicity in San Francisco, University of Chicago Press (2015); “The Merchant Crusaders: Private Developers and Fair Housing, 1948 – 1973,” Pacific Historical Review (2016); “Imagined San Francisco,” a GIS-based public history project, in development with the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA) at Stanford University; and “Skatepark as Neoliberal Playground: Urban Governance, Recreation Space, and the Cultivation of Personal Responsibility.” Space and Culture (2009).

Student Scholar

Michelle Bynum, History of Art and Architecture

Molly Jud

Biology

Institute of Molecular Biology

Dr. Molly Jud completed her undergraduate study in biology and anthropology at Grand Valley State University in 2006. She completed her MS in biology at Central Michigan University in 2008 and her PhD in human genetics from the University of Utah in 2016. She joined Bruce Bowerman’s lab in the Institute of Molecular Biology as a post-doctoral researcher in 2016. Her current research focuses on understanding the mechanisms regulating cell shape changes and cell migration that contribute to the developmental process of morphogenesis by screening for temperature sensitive mutant alleles in C. elegans. Her publications include “Epidermal-Templated Development: The Role of Embryonic JNK Organizing Centers” (in preparation with S. Metherall and A. Letsou); “Mummy, a UDP-N-Acetylglucosamine Pyrophosphorylase, Modulates Dpp Signaling in the Embryonic Epidermis of Drosophila” (with G. B. Humphreys et al.), Dev Biology (2013); and “Large P Body-like RNPs Form in C. elegans Oocytes in Response to Arrested Ovulation, Heat Shock, Osmotic Stress, and Anoxia and are Regulated by the Major Sperm Protein Pathway” (with M. J. Czerwinski et al.), Dev Biology (2008).

Student Scholar

Thalia Padilla, Biology

Atsushi Kikumoto

Psychology

Atsushi Kikumoto earned his bachelor’s degree from the UO in 2013. He first joined Ulrich Mayr’s Cognitive Dynamics Laboratory in 2011 and continues in that lab as a fourth-year PhD student. Kikumoto’s current research focuses on working memory and attention. His publications include “Dynamics of Task-Set Carry-over: Evidence from Eye Movement Analyses” (with J. Hubbard and U. Mayr), Psychonomic Bulletin & Review (2015) and “Control of Task Sequences: What is the Role of Language?” (with U. Mayr, J. Hubbard, and M. A. Redford), Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition (2014).

Student Scholar

Megan Carson, Psychology

Ulrich Mayr

Psychology

Ulrich Mayr received his Dr. Phil. degree in 1992 from the Free University of Berlin. Before joining the University of Oregon Department of Psychology in 2000, he was a researcher and post-doctoral student at the Max Plank Institute for Human Development and Education in Berlin and a researcher and instructor at the University of Potsdam. Currently department chair, Dr. Mayr notes that the central focus of his lab is “figuring out what makes the human mind as flexible as it is, but also why it is not always as flexible as we want it to be.” His publications include “Cognitive Aging: Is There a Dark Side to Environmental Support?” (with U. Lindenberger), Trends in Cognitive Science (2014); “Long-Term Memory and the Control of Attentional Control” (with D. Kuhns and J. Hubbard), Cognitive Psychology (2014); and “Executive Dysfunction Assessed With a Task-Switching Task Following Concussion” (with C. LaRoux et al.), PLOS ONE (2014).
Student Scholar

Bradley M. Boyce, Psychology
Megan Carson, Psychology

Jeffrey Measelle

Psychology

Jeffrey Measelle, Associate Professor of Psychology, received his PhD from UC Berkeley in 1997 and joined the University of Oregon faculty in 1999. He is co-director with Dr. Jennifer Ablow of the Sociobiology Lab. His research seeks to identify “family processes that adversely influence the development of very young children’s psychobiology” and the role that early caregiving plays in supporting the neurobiological development of emotion regulation. Also, Measelle studies children’s health and well-being in other countries, most notably in South East Asia. Dr. Measelle’s recent publications include “Emotion Suppression and Maternal Vagal Regulation during the Still-Face Paradigm” (with J.E. Oppenheimer et al.), Infant Behavior & Development (2013); “Poverty, Problem Behavior and Promise: Differential Susceptibility among Infants Reared in Poverty” (with E. Conradt and J.C. Ablow), Psychological Science (2013); “Emotion Suppression and Maternal Vagal Regulation During the Still-Face Paradigm” (with J.E. Oppenheimer, H. K. Laurent, and J.E. Ablow), Infant Behavior & Development (in press); and “The Social Determinants of Infant Health in Laos” (with colleagues at the Lao Friends Hospital for Children), Lancet (in press).

Student Scholar

Tonya C. Hansberry, Psychology

Christopher Minson

Human Physiology

Dr. Christopher Minson received his PhD in 1997 from Pennsylvania State University. After a postdoctoral position at the Mayo Clinic, he joined the UO faculty in 2000. He is the Singer Endowed Professor of Human Physiology. Dr. Minson has received funding from the NIH, American Heart Association, and the Department of Defense. His research is focused on how the blood vessels, heart, and nervous system regulate blood pressure and blood flow in humans. One line of research investigates how humans adapt to heat stress. Current work is directed towards understanding how chronic heat therapy can be used to improve cardiovascular health of people with spinal cord injuries. A second line of research investigates how natural and synthetic forms of estrogen and progesterone impact cardiovascular health and blood pressure regulation in women. His teaching emphasis is in the areas of cardiovascular and environmental physiology. Recent publications include “Passive heat therapy improves endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and blood pressure in sedentary humans” (with V.E. Brunt, M.J. Howard, M.A Francisco, and B.R. Ely), J Physiol (2016); “Thermoregulatory Considerations for the Performance of Exercise in Spinal Cord Injury,” a chapter in the book The Physiology of Exercise in Spinal Cord Injury with V.E. Brunt (2016); and “Acute hot water immersion is protective against impaired vascular function following forearm ischemia-reperfusion in young healthy humans” (with V.E. Brunt, A.T. Jeckell, B.R. Ely, M.J. Howard, D.H.J. Thijssen) Amer J of Physiol (2016).

Student Scholar

Lindan Comrada, Biochemistry

Bitty Roy

Biology

Institute of Ecology and Evolution

Dr. Bitty Roy earned her PhD in plant ecology from the Claremont Graduate School in 1992, was a postdoctoral fellow at UC Davis and Berkeley for four years, and an Assistant Professor at the Swiss Federal Technical University (ETH) for six years before joining the UO faculty in 2001. Currently a professor of biology and member of the Institute of Ecology and Evolution, her research interests are ecological and evolutionary consequences of fungi (pathogens and endophytes) in natural plant communities, invasion biology of grasses and fungi, and floral mimicry. She enjoys working with undergraduates doing research and has had at least one honors student every year she has been in residence at the UO. Her more than 70 publications include several co-authored with undergraduates, including “Disentangling Visual and Olfactory Signals in Mushroom-mimicking Dracula Orchids Using Realistic Three-dimensional Printed Flowers” that came out this year (author list: T. Policha, A. Davis, M. Barnadas, B. Dentinger, R. Raguso and B. A. Roy; Aleah Davis was the honors student). Another recent (2014) publication with an honors student is titled “Tall Fescue is a Potential Spillover Reservoir Host for Alternaria Species” by H. Wilson (the honors student) as well as G. K. Blaisdell, G. Carroll, and B. Roy.

Student Scholar

Aaron Nelson, Biology

Robert Schofield

Physics

Robert Schofield received his PhD in physics from the University of Oregon for his role in developing an accelerator-based microprobe and for its biological applications. With interests in gravitational waves and structural biophysics, he spends half of his time in Washington working on LIGO, a project to detect gravitational radiation from cataclysmic events in the universe. At the University of Oregon, Schofield studies the materials and behaviors that small organisms have developed to deal with the unique mechanical challenges of being small. In particular, the lab studies the chemical and mechanical properties of the heavy-element biomaterials used in the tools of small organisms and the behavioral adaptations that leafcutter ants have made to cope with mandible wear, a factor that is especially problematic because of their small size. Dr. Schofield’s scholarly articles on leafcutter ants date from 1990.

Student Scholar

David M. Lee, Biochemistry, Biology

Elizabeth Skowron

Psychology

Dr. Elizabeth Skowron earned her PhD in counseling psychology from the State University of New York at Albany in 1995. After clinical internships and post-doctoral positions at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center and UC San Francisco’s Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, Skowron was on the faculty at Penn State University for 11 years before joining the UO faculty in 2012. Her research seeks to clarify the individual and joint contributions of neurobiology and experience in the development of self-regulation and school readiness in at-risk children; to understand the role of self-regulation in parenting-at-risk; and to study the biobehavioral change processes in parenting programs that reduce the risk for child maltreatment. Dr. Skowron’s publications include “State-of-the-Science on Prevention of Elder Abuse and Lessons Learned from Child Abuse and Domestic Violence Prevention: Toward a Conceptual Framework for Research” (with J.A. Teresi et al.), Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect (in press); “Intersections Between Cardiac Physiology, Emotion Regulation, and Interpersonal Warmth in Preschoolers: Implications for Drug Abuse Prevention from Translational Neuroscience” (with C. Clark, R. Giuliano, and P. Fisher), Drug and Alcohol Dependence (2016); “Growth Models of Dyadic Synchrony and Mother-Child Vagal Tone in the Context of Parenting At-Risk” (with R. Giuliano, and E. Berkman, E.), Biological Psychology (2015); and “Early Adversity, RSA, and Inhibitory Control: Evidence of Children’s Neurobiological Sensitivity to Social Context” (with E. A. Cipriano-Essel et al.), Developmental Psychobiology (2014).

Student Scholar

Stefani Paige Evans, Psychology

Xiaoning Sun

Psychology

Xiaoning Sun, a doctoral student in the University of Oregon Department of Psychology, received her BS and MS from the UO. Her research interest lies in the realm of developmental psychopathology. She is currently pursuing two research topics. First, she is interested in the phenomenon of resilience and children’s ability to adapt well to early risks/adversities. She is exploring the protective mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, integrating the roles of child-, familial-, and environment-level protective factors. Second, she pursues research in parenting practices and child adjustment problems across different cultures.
Student Scholar

Tonya C. Hansberry, Psychology

Stephanie “Lani” Teves

Ethnic Studies

Dr. Stephanie ‘Lani’ Teves earned her PhD from the University of Michigan in 2012 and joined the UO faculty in the Department of Ethnic Studies in 2014. With interests in indigenous politics, native and women of color feminisms, Native Pacific cultural studies, and queer theory, Dr. Teves describes her work as an effort to engage “the performance of Native Pacific Islander genders and sexualities … to examine the political and cultural stakes of Native/Indigenous cultural performance and its relationship to emergent decolonization movements, settler-colonialism, and militarism in the Pacific.” Her publications include “Cocoa Chandelier’s Confessional: Kanaka Maoli Performance and Aloha in Drag,” In Critical Ethnic Studies: An Anthology, Duke University Press (2016); “Aloha State Apparatuses,” American Quarterly (2015); Native Studies Keywords, ed, with A. Smith and M. Raheja, U. Arizona Press (2015); and “A Critical Reading of Aloha and Visual Sovereignty in Ke Kulana he Māhū,” International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies (2014).

Student Scholar

Demiliza Saramosing, Journalism / Ethnic Studies

Don Tucker

Psychology

Dr. Don Tucker earned his PhD from Pennsylvania State University in 1974 and joined the faculty in the UO Department of Psychology in 1984. His interests include how cognition is regulated by emotional arousal, how mechanisms of the limbic system seem to regulate learning and memory according to strategic motivational controls, and how limbic control of cerebral excitability is disrupted in epilepsy. Dr. Tucker’s Brain Electrophysiological lab is co-located with Electrical Geodesics, Inc., the maker of dense-array geodesic EEG sensor nets. Dr. Tucker’s publications include “Slow-Frequency Pulsed Transcranial Electrical Stimulation for Modulation of Cortical Plasticity Based on Reciprocity Targeting with Precision Electrical Head Modeling” (with P. Luu et al.), Front Hum Neurosci (2016); “Changes in P3b Latency and Amplitude Reflect Expertise Acquisition in a Football Visuomotor Learning Task” (with K. K., Morgan and P. Luu), PloS ONE (2016); “In Vivo Quantification of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in a Neonatal Piglet Model using an EEG-layout Based Electrical Impedance Tomography Array” (with T. Tang et al.), Physiological Measurement (2016); and “Principal Components of Electrocortical Activity During Self-Evaluation Indicate Depressive Symptom Severity” (with A. C. Waters), Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2016).

Student Scholar

Bradley Boyce, Psychology

Jessica Vasquez-Tokos

Sociology

Dr. Jessica Vasquez-Tokos earned her PhD from UC Berkeley in 2007. Before joining UO faculty in the Department of Sociology in 2012, she taught at the University of Kansas. Currently Associate Professor of Sociology, her research and teaching interests focus on race/ethnicity, Mexican Americans/Latinos, gender, family, and intermarriage. Her first book, Mexican Americans Across Generations: Immigrant Families, Racial Realities (NYU Press, 2011) was listed in Choice ‘s “Annual Outstanding Academic Titles.” Other publications include “Talking Back to Controlling Images:  Latinos’ Changing Responses to Racism over the Life Course” (with K. Norton-Smith), Ethnic and Racial Studies (2016); “Disciplined Preferences: Explaining the (Re)Production of Latino Endogamy,” Social Problems (2015); and “Race Cognizance and Colorblindness: Effects of Latino/Non-Hispanic white intermarriage,” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race (2014).

Student Scholar

Benjamin Hinde, Sociology

Maureen Zalewski

Psychology

Dr. Maureen Zalewski received her PhD from the University of Washington in 2012 and joined the UO faculty in the Department of Psychology the next year. She is interested in risk factors that predict the development of emotion regulation, focusing her research on mothers with symptoms of borderline personality disorder because many of those individuals struggle with emotion dysregulation and have histories of childhood trauma, two issues that are known parenting risk factors. Also, Dr. Zalewski is formally trained in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and supervises a DBT Skills practicum at the University of Oregon Psychology Training Clinic. Her publications include “Income, Cumulative risk, and Longitudinal Profiles of Hypothalamic–Pituitary–adrenal axis Activity in Preschool-age Children” (with L. Lengua, S. Thompson, and C. Kiff), Development and Psychopathology (2016); “A Qualitative Assessment of Parenting Challenges and Treatment Needs of Mothers with Borderline Personality Disorder” (with S. D. Stepp, D. J. Whalen, and L. N. Scott), Journal of Psychotherapy Integration (2015); “Developmental Trajectories of Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms and Psychosocial Functioning in Adolescence” (with A. Wright, M. Hallquist, and S. Stepp), Journal of Personality Disorders (2015); and “Maternal Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms and the Parenting of Adolescent Girls” (wih S. D. Stepp et al.), Journal of Personality Disorders (2014).

Student Scholar

Stefani Paige Evans, Psychology